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Insulin Resistance Diet: A Nutritionist’s Guide...
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Imagine how different your life would be if you could heal your metabolic damage, help reverse prediabetes, and fight PCOS, simply by changing what you eat. Is this really possible through dietary and lifestyle intervention? Can you genuinely improve insulin sensitivity just by altering what’s on your plate? In my experience you can, and not only that, it’s actually the most effective way to do it. Alongside this, you can also finally lose that stubborn belly fat, energize your body, improve concentration levels, and sleep more soundly. Just by making a small change to your eating habits. When it comes to health, it’s essentially the food, and it always has been. Simon Keller is a nutritionist who specializes in all forms human physiology and peak performance. However it wasn’t until leaving University life and entering into the ‘real world’ did he start to understand how these theoretical topics worked in a practical sense - through 10 years of training and consulting clients within his health and wellness facility in London. In this insightful and functional book, Keller gives readers a firsthand look into the scientific considerations regarding Insulin Resistance, as well as a practical guide on how to: Tell if you are indeed insulin resistant - what are the warming signs Become aware of the specific conditions caused by metabolic damage Understand the implications excess insulin can have on PCOS The potential infertility risks of not sorting out these issues Truly understanding the Glycemic Load impact of the foods we eat How to get portion sizes & meal frequency right for optimal blood sugar control Example meal plans and recipes to reduce insulin resistance Exercise protocols to re-sensitize skeletal muscle to the effects of insulin once again … and much more. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Richard Morris. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/114175/bk_acx0_114175_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 16.02.2020
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EMF. Eclipse Modeling Framework
35,99 € *
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The Eclpise Modeling Framework (EMF) is a framework and code generation facility that lets you define a model in any of these forms--Java interfaces, UML diagram, or XML Schema. EMF doesn't require a completely different methodology or any sophisticated modeling tools. All you need to get started with EMF are the Eclipse Java Development Tools. EMF relates modeling concepts directly to their implementations, thereby bringing to Eclipse-and Java developers in general-the benefits of modeling with a low cost of entry. Unlike most tools of this type, EMF is truly integrated with and tuned for efficient programming. It answers the often-asked question, "Should I model or should I program?" with a resounding, "Both." This book, written by the lead architects of EMF, provides both an introduction and tutorial to how to leverage and work with this powerful framework. In addition to the new coverage (see overflow page) this book provides: · A basic overview of the most important concepts in EMF and modeling. · Analysis of the most important framework classes and generator patterns including insightful discussions of various design alternatives. · Examples of many common framework customizations and programming techniques. Product Description EMF: Eclipse Modeling Framework Dave Steinberg Frank Budinsky Marcelo Paternostro Ed Merks Series Editors: Erich Gamma . Lee Nackman . John Wiegand The Authoritative Guide to EMF Modeling and Code Generation The Eclipse Modeling Framework enables developers to rapidly construct robust applications based on surprisingly simple models. Now, in this thoroughly revised Second Edition, the project's developers offer expert guidance, insight, and examples for solving real-world problems with EMF, accelerating development processes, and improving software quality. This edition contains more than 40% new material, plus updates throughout to make it even more useful and practical. The authors illuminate the key concepts and techniques of EMF modeling, analyze EMF's most important framework classes and generator patterns, guide you through choosing optimal designs, and introduce powerful framework customizations and programming techniques. Coverage includes . Defining models with Java, UML, XML Schema, and Ecore . NEW: Using extended Ecore modeling to fully unify XML with UML and Java . Generating high-quality code to implement models and editors . Understanding and customizing generated code . Complete documentation of @model Javadoc tags, generator model properties, and resource save and load options . NEW: Leveraging the latest EMF features, including extended metadata, feature maps, EStore, cross-reference adapters, copiers, and content types . NEW: Chapters on change recording, validation, and utilizing EMF in stand-alone and Eclipse RCP applications . NEW: Modeling generics with Ecore and generating Java 5 code About the Authors Dave Steinberg is a software developer in IBM Software Group. He has worked with Eclipse and modeling technologies since joining the company, and has been a committer on the EMF project since its debut in 2002. Frank Budinsky, a senior architect in IBM Software Group, is an original coinventor of EMF and a founding member of the EMF project at Eclipse. He is currently cochair of the Service Data Objects (SDO) specification technical committee at OASIS and lead SDO architect for IBM. Marcelo Paternostro is a software architect and engineer in IBM Software Group. He is an EMF committer and has been an active contributor to several other Eclipse projects. Before joining IBM, Marcelo managed, designed, and implemented numerous projects using Rational's tools and processes. Ed Merks is the project lead of EMF and a colead of the top-level Modeling project at Eclipse. He holds a Ph.D. in Computing Science and has many years of in-depth experience in the design and implementation of languages, frameworks, and application development environments. Ed works as a software consultant in partnership with itemis AG. Backcover EMF: Eclipse Modeling Framework Dave Steinberg Frank Budinsky Marcelo Paternostro Ed Merks Series Editors: Erich Gamma . Lee Nackman . John Wiegand The Authoritative Guide to EMF Modeling and Code Generation The Eclipse Modeling Framework enables developers to rapidly construct robust applications based on surprisingly simple models. Now, in this thoroughly revised Second Edition, the project's developers offer expert guidance, insight, and examples for solving real-world problems with EMF, accelerating development processes, and improving software quality. This edition contains more than 40% new material, plus updates throughout to make it even more useful and practical. The authors illuminate the key concepts and techniques of EMF modeling, analyze EMF's most important framework classes and generator patterns, guide you through choosing optimal designs, and introduce powerful framework customizations and programming techniques. Coverage includes . Defining models with Java, UML, XML Schema, and Ecore . NEW: Using extended Ecore modeling to fully unify XML with UML and Java . Generating high-quality code to implement models and editors . Understanding and customizing generated code . Complete documentation of @model Javadoc tags, generator model properties, and resource save and load options . NEW: Leveraging the latest EMF features, including extended metadata, feature maps, EStore, cross-reference adapters, copiers, and content types . NEW: Chapters on change recording, validation, and utilizing EMF in stand-alone and Eclipse RCP applications . NEW: Modeling generics with Ecore and generating Java 5 code About the Authors Dave Steinberg is a software developer in IBM Software Group. He has worked with Eclipse and modeling technologies since joining the company, and has been a committer on the EMF project since its debut in 2002. Frank Budinsky, a senior architect in IBM Software Group, is an original coinventor of EMF and a founding member of the EMF project at Eclipse. He is currently cochair of the Service Data Objects (SDO) specification technical committee at OASIS and lead SDO architect for IBM. Marcelo Paternostro is a software architect and engineer in IBM Software Group. He is an EMF committer and has been an active contributor to several other Eclipse projects. Before joining IBM, Marcelo managed, designed, and implemented numerous projects using Rational's tools and processes. Ed Merks is the project lead of EMF and a colead of the top-level Modeling project at Eclipse. He holds a Ph.D. in Computing Science and has many years of in-depth experience in the design and implementation of languages, frameworks, and application development environments. Ed works as a software consultant in partnership with itemis AG. Foreword by Richard C. Gronback xix Foreword by Mike Milinkovich xxi Preface xxiii Acknowledgments xxvii References xxix Part I EMF Overview 1 Chapter 1 Eclipse 3 1.1 The Projects 4 1.1.1 The Eclipse Project 4 1.1.2 The Modeling Project 5 1.1.3 The Tools Project 5 1.1.4 The Technology Project 5 1.1.5 Other Projects 5 1.2 The Eclipse Platform 6 1.2.1 Plug-In Architecture 6 1.2.2 Workspace Resources 7 1.2.3 Platform UI 7 1.2.4 Rich Client Platform 9 1.3 More Information 9 Chapter 2 Introducing EMF 11 2.1 Unifying Java, XML, and UML 12 2.2 Modeling vs. Programming 15 2.3 Defining the Model 16 2.3.1 The Ecore (Meta) Model 17 2.3.2 Creating and Editing the Model 19 2.3.3 XMI Serialization 20 2.3.4 Java Annotations 21 2.3.5 The Ecore "Big Picture" 23 2.4 Generating Code 23 2.4.1 Generated Model Classes 24 2.4.2 Other Generated "Stuff" 26 2.4.3 Regeneration and Merge 27 2.4.4 The Generator Model 28 2.5 The Runtime Framework 29 2.5.1 Notification and Adapters 29 2.5.2 Object Persistence 31 2.5.3 The Reflective EObject API 35 2.5.4 Dynamic EMF 36 2.5.5 Foundation for Data Integration 38 2.6 EMF and Modeling Standards 39 2.6.1 Unified Modeling Language 39 2.6.2 Meta-Object Facility 39 2.6.3 XML Metadata Interchange 40 2.6.4 Model Driven Architecture 40 Chapter 3 Model Editing with EMF.Edit 41 3.1 Displaying and Editing EMF Models 42 3.1.1 Eclipse UI Basics 43 3.1.2 EMF.Edit Support 45 3.2 Item Providers 46 3.2.1 Content and Label Item Providers 47 3.2.2 Item Property Source 49 3.2.3 Command Factory 50 3.2.4 Change Notification 51 3.2.5 Item Provider Implementation Classes 53 3.3 Command Framework 54 3.3.1 Common Command Framework 55 3.3.2 EMF.Edit Commands 59 3.3.3 EditingDomain 61 3.4 Generating EMF.Edit Code 65 3.4.1 Edit Generation 66 3.4.2 Editor Generation 67 3.4.3 Regenerating EMF.Edit Plug-Ins 68 Chapter 4 Using EMF-A Simple Overview 69 4.1 Example Model: The Primer Purchase Order 70 4.2 Creating EMF Models and Projects 71 4.2.1 Creating an EMF Model from Annotated Java 72 4.2.2 Creating an EMF Project from a Rational Rose Class Model 80 4.2.3 Creating an EMF Project from an XML Schema 86 4.2.4 Creating a Generator Model for an Ecore Model 89 4.2.5 Other Formats 92 4.3 Generating Code 93 4.4 Running the Application 95 4.5 Continuing Development 98 Part II Defining EMF Models 101 Chapter 5 Ecore Modeling Concepts 103 5.1 Ecore Model Uses 104 5.2 The Ecore Kernel 105 5.3 Structural Features 106 5.3.1 Attributes 110 5.3.2 References 111 5.4 Behavioral Features 112 5.5 Classifiers 113 5.5.1 Classes 114 5.5.2 Data Types 116 5.6 Packages and Factories 118 5.7 Annotations 119 5.7.1 Annotations in EMF 121 5.8 Modeled Data Types 123 5.9 Ecore and User Models 125 Chapter 6 UML 127 6.1 UML Packages 128 6.2 UML Specification for Classifiers 128 6.2.1 Classes 129 6.2.2 Enumerated Types 130 6.2.3 Data Types 131 6.3 UML Specification for Attributes 132 6.3.1 Single-Valued Attributes 132 6.3.2 Multi-Valued Attributes 133 6.3.3 Attributes with a Default Value 133 6.4 UML Specification for References 134 6.4.1 Bidirectional, Non-Containment References 135 6.4.2 Containment References 136 6.4.3 Map References 136 6.5 UML Specification for Operations 138 6.6 Documentation &nbspEMF: Eclipse Modeling Framework Dave Steinberg Frank Budinsky Marcelo Paternostro Ed Merks Series Editors: Erich Gamma - Lee Nackman - John Wiegand The Authoritative Guide to EMF Modeling and Code Generation The Eclipse Modeling Framework enables developers to rapidly construct robust applications based on surprisingly simple models. Now, in this thoroughly revised Second Edition, the project's developers offer expert guidance, insight, and examples for solving real-world problems with EMF, accelerating development processes, and improving software quality. This edition contains more than 40% new material, plus updates throughout to make it even more useful and practical. The authors illuminate the key concepts and techniques of EMF modeling, analyze EMF's most important framework classes and generator patterns, guide you through choosing optimal designs, and introduce powerful framework customizations and programming techniques. Coverage includes - Defining models with Java, UML, XML Schema, and Ecore - NEW: Using extended Ecore modeling to fully unify XML with UML and Java - Generating high-quality code to implement models and editors - Understanding and customizing generated code - Complete documentation of @model Javadoc tags, generator model properties, and resource save and load options - NEW: Leveraging the latest EMF features, including extended metadata, feature maps, EStore, cross-reference adapters, copiers, and content types - NEW: Chapters on change recording, validation, and utilizing EMF in stand-alone and Eclipse RCP applications - NEW: Modeling generics with Ecore and generating Java 5 code About the Authors Dave Steinberg is a software developer in IBM Software Group. He has worked with Eclipse and modeling technologies since joining the company, and has been a committer on the EMF project since its debut in 2002. Frank Budinsky, a senior architect in IBM Software Group, is an original coinventor of EMF and a founding member of the EMF project at Eclipse. He is currently cochair of the Service Data Objects (SDO) specification technical committee at OASIS and lead SDO architect for IBM. Marcelo Paternostro is a software architect and engineer in IBM Software Group. He is an EMF committer and has been an active contributor to several other Eclipse projects. Before joining IBM, Marcelo managed, designed, and implemented numerous projects using Rational's tools and processes. Ed Merks is the project lead of EMF and a colead of the top-level Modeling project at Eclipse. He holds a Ph.D. in Computing Science and has many years of in-depth experience in the design and implementation of languages, frameworks, and application development environments. Ed wor

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 16.02.2020
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EMF. Eclipse Modeling Framework
35,99 € *
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The Eclpise Modeling Framework (EMF) is a framework and code generation facility that lets you define a model in any of these forms--Java interfaces, UML diagram, or XML Schema. EMF doesn't require a completely different methodology or any sophisticated modeling tools. All you need to get started with EMF are the Eclipse Java Development Tools. EMF relates modeling concepts directly to their implementations, thereby bringing to Eclipse-and Java developers in general-the benefits of modeling with a low cost of entry. Unlike most tools of this type, EMF is truly integrated with and tuned for efficient programming. It answers the often-asked question, "Should I model or should I program?" with a resounding, "Both." This book, written by the lead architects of EMF, provides both an introduction and tutorial to how to leverage and work with this powerful framework. In addition to the new coverage (see overflow page) this book provides: · A basic overview of the most important concepts in EMF and modeling. · Analysis of the most important framework classes and generator patterns including insightful discussions of various design alternatives. · Examples of many common framework customizations and programming techniques. Product Description EMF: Eclipse Modeling Framework Dave Steinberg Frank Budinsky Marcelo Paternostro Ed Merks Series Editors: Erich Gamma . Lee Nackman . John Wiegand The Authoritative Guide to EMF Modeling and Code Generation The Eclipse Modeling Framework enables developers to rapidly construct robust applications based on surprisingly simple models. Now, in this thoroughly revised Second Edition, the project's developers offer expert guidance, insight, and examples for solving real-world problems with EMF, accelerating development processes, and improving software quality. This edition contains more than 40% new material, plus updates throughout to make it even more useful and practical. The authors illuminate the key concepts and techniques of EMF modeling, analyze EMF's most important framework classes and generator patterns, guide you through choosing optimal designs, and introduce powerful framework customizations and programming techniques. Coverage includes . Defining models with Java, UML, XML Schema, and Ecore . NEW: Using extended Ecore modeling to fully unify XML with UML and Java . Generating high-quality code to implement models and editors . Understanding and customizing generated code . Complete documentation of @model Javadoc tags, generator model properties, and resource save and load options . NEW: Leveraging the latest EMF features, including extended metadata, feature maps, EStore, cross-reference adapters, copiers, and content types . NEW: Chapters on change recording, validation, and utilizing EMF in stand-alone and Eclipse RCP applications . NEW: Modeling generics with Ecore and generating Java 5 code About the Authors Dave Steinberg is a software developer in IBM Software Group. He has worked with Eclipse and modeling technologies since joining the company, and has been a committer on the EMF project since its debut in 2002. Frank Budinsky, a senior architect in IBM Software Group, is an original coinventor of EMF and a founding member of the EMF project at Eclipse. He is currently cochair of the Service Data Objects (SDO) specification technical committee at OASIS and lead SDO architect for IBM. Marcelo Paternostro is a software architect and engineer in IBM Software Group. He is an EMF committer and has been an active contributor to several other Eclipse projects. Before joining IBM, Marcelo managed, designed, and implemented numerous projects using Rational's tools and processes. Ed Merks is the project lead of EMF and a colead of the top-level Modeling project at Eclipse. He holds a Ph.D. in Computing Science and has many years of in-depth experience in the design and implementation of languages, frameworks, and application development environments. Ed works as a software consultant in partnership with itemis AG. Backcover EMF: Eclipse Modeling Framework Dave Steinberg Frank Budinsky Marcelo Paternostro Ed Merks Series Editors: Erich Gamma . Lee Nackman . John Wiegand The Authoritative Guide to EMF Modeling and Code Generation The Eclipse Modeling Framework enables developers to rapidly construct robust applications based on surprisingly simple models. Now, in this thoroughly revised Second Edition, the project's developers offer expert guidance, insight, and examples for solving real-world problems with EMF, accelerating development processes, and improving software quality. This edition contains more than 40% new material, plus updates throughout to make it even more useful and practical. The authors illuminate the key concepts and techniques of EMF modeling, analyze EMF's most important framework classes and generator patterns, guide you through choosing optimal designs, and introduce powerful framework customizations and programming techniques. Coverage includes . Defining models with Java, UML, XML Schema, and Ecore . NEW: Using extended Ecore modeling to fully unify XML with UML and Java . Generating high-quality code to implement models and editors . Understanding and customizing generated code . Complete documentation of @model Javadoc tags, generator model properties, and resource save and load options . NEW: Leveraging the latest EMF features, including extended metadata, feature maps, EStore, cross-reference adapters, copiers, and content types . NEW: Chapters on change recording, validation, and utilizing EMF in stand-alone and Eclipse RCP applications . NEW: Modeling generics with Ecore and generating Java 5 code About the Authors Dave Steinberg is a software developer in IBM Software Group. He has worked with Eclipse and modeling technologies since joining the company, and has been a committer on the EMF project since its debut in 2002. Frank Budinsky, a senior architect in IBM Software Group, is an original coinventor of EMF and a founding member of the EMF project at Eclipse. He is currently cochair of the Service Data Objects (SDO) specification technical committee at OASIS and lead SDO architect for IBM. Marcelo Paternostro is a software architect and engineer in IBM Software Group. He is an EMF committer and has been an active contributor to several other Eclipse projects. Before joining IBM, Marcelo managed, designed, and implemented numerous projects using Rational's tools and processes. Ed Merks is the project lead of EMF and a colead of the top-level Modeling project at Eclipse. He holds a Ph.D. in Computing Science and has many years of in-depth experience in the design and implementation of languages, frameworks, and application development environments. Ed works as a software consultant in partnership with itemis AG. Foreword by Richard C. Gronback xix Foreword by Mike Milinkovich xxi Preface xxiii Acknowledgments xxvii References xxix Part I EMF Overview 1 Chapter 1 Eclipse 3 1.1 The Projects 4 1.1.1 The Eclipse Project 4 1.1.2 The Modeling Project 5 1.1.3 The Tools Project 5 1.1.4 The Technology Project 5 1.1.5 Other Projects 5 1.2 The Eclipse Platform 6 1.2.1 Plug-In Architecture 6 1.2.2 Workspace Resources 7 1.2.3 Platform UI 7 1.2.4 Rich Client Platform 9 1.3 More Information 9 Chapter 2 Introducing EMF 11 2.1 Unifying Java, XML, and UML 12 2.2 Modeling vs. Programming 15 2.3 Defining the Model 16 2.3.1 The Ecore (Meta) Model 17 2.3.2 Creating and Editing the Model 19 2.3.3 XMI Serialization 20 2.3.4 Java Annotations 21 2.3.5 The Ecore "Big Picture" 23 2.4 Generating Code 23 2.4.1 Generated Model Classes 24 2.4.2 Other Generated "Stuff" 26 2.4.3 Regeneration and Merge 27 2.4.4 The Generator Model 28 2.5 The Runtime Framework 29 2.5.1 Notification and Adapters 29 2.5.2 Object Persistence 31 2.5.3 The Reflective EObject API 35 2.5.4 Dynamic EMF 36 2.5.5 Foundation for Data Integration 38 2.6 EMF and Modeling Standards 39 2.6.1 Unified Modeling Language 39 2.6.2 Meta-Object Facility 39 2.6.3 XML Metadata Interchange 40 2.6.4 Model Driven Architecture 40 Chapter 3 Model Editing with EMF.Edit 41 3.1 Displaying and Editing EMF Models 42 3.1.1 Eclipse UI Basics 43 3.1.2 EMF.Edit Support 45 3.2 Item Providers 46 3.2.1 Content and Label Item Providers 47 3.2.2 Item Property Source 49 3.2.3 Command Factory 50 3.2.4 Change Notification 51 3.2.5 Item Provider Implementation Classes 53 3.3 Command Framework 54 3.3.1 Common Command Framework 55 3.3.2 EMF.Edit Commands 59 3.3.3 EditingDomain 61 3.4 Generating EMF.Edit Code 65 3.4.1 Edit Generation 66 3.4.2 Editor Generation 67 3.4.3 Regenerating EMF.Edit Plug-Ins 68 Chapter 4 Using EMF-A Simple Overview 69 4.1 Example Model: The Primer Purchase Order 70 4.2 Creating EMF Models and Projects 71 4.2.1 Creating an EMF Model from Annotated Java 72 4.2.2 Creating an EMF Project from a Rational Rose Class Model 80 4.2.3 Creating an EMF Project from an XML Schema 86 4.2.4 Creating a Generator Model for an Ecore Model 89 4.2.5 Other Formats 92 4.3 Generating Code 93 4.4 Running the Application 95 4.5 Continuing Development 98 Part II Defining EMF Models 101 Chapter 5 Ecore Modeling Concepts 103 5.1 Ecore Model Uses 104 5.2 The Ecore Kernel 105 5.3 Structural Features 106 5.3.1 Attributes 110 5.3.2 References 111 5.4 Behavioral Features 112 5.5 Classifiers 113 5.5.1 Classes 114 5.5.2 Data Types 116 5.6 Packages and Factories 118 5.7 Annotations 119 5.7.1 Annotations in EMF 121 5.8 Modeled Data Types 123 5.9 Ecore and User Models 125 Chapter 6 UML 127 6.1 UML Packages 128 6.2 UML Specification for Classifiers 128 6.2.1 Classes 129 6.2.2 Enumerated Types 130 6.2.3 Data Types 131 6.3 UML Specification for Attributes 132 6.3.1 Single-Valued Attributes 132 6.3.2 Multi-Valued Attributes 133 6.3.3 Attributes with a Default Value 133 6.4 UML Specification for References 134 6.4.1 Bidirectional, Non-Containment References 135 6.4.2 Containment References 136 6.4.3 Map References 136 6.5 UML Specification for Operations 138 6.6 Documentation &nbspEMF: Eclipse Modeling Framework Dave Steinberg Frank Budinsky Marcelo Paternostro Ed Merks Series Editors: Erich Gamma - Lee Nackman - John Wiegand The Authoritative Guide to EMF Modeling and Code Generation The Eclipse Modeling Framework enables developers to rapidly construct robust applications based on surprisingly simple models. Now, in this thoroughly revised Second Edition, the project's developers offer expert guidance, insight, and examples for solving real-world problems with EMF, accelerating development processes, and improving software quality. This edition contains more than 40% new material, plus updates throughout to make it even more useful and practical. The authors illuminate the key concepts and techniques of EMF modeling, analyze EMF's most important framework classes and generator patterns, guide you through choosing optimal designs, and introduce powerful framework customizations and programming techniques. Coverage includes - Defining models with Java, UML, XML Schema, and Ecore - NEW: Using extended Ecore modeling to fully unify XML with UML and Java - Generating high-quality code to implement models and editors - Understanding and customizing generated code - Complete documentation of @model Javadoc tags, generator model properties, and resource save and load options - NEW: Leveraging the latest EMF features, including extended metadata, feature maps, EStore, cross-reference adapters, copiers, and content types - NEW: Chapters on change recording, validation, and utilizing EMF in stand-alone and Eclipse RCP applications - NEW: Modeling generics with Ecore and generating Java 5 code About the Authors Dave Steinberg is a software developer in IBM Software Group. He has worked with Eclipse and modeling technologies since joining the company, and has been a committer on the EMF project since its debut in 2002. Frank Budinsky, a senior architect in IBM Software Group, is an original coinventor of EMF and a founding member of the EMF project at Eclipse. He is currently cochair of the Service Data Objects (SDO) specification technical committee at OASIS and lead SDO architect for IBM. Marcelo Paternostro is a software architect and engineer in IBM Software Group. He is an EMF committer and has been an active contributor to several other Eclipse projects. Before joining IBM, Marcelo managed, designed, and implemented numerous projects using Rational's tools and processes. Ed Merks is the project lead of EMF and a colead of the top-level Modeling project at Eclipse. He holds a Ph.D. in Computing Science and has many years of in-depth experience in the design and implementation of languages, frameworks, and application development environments. Ed wor

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 16.02.2020
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A Medium-Voltage Multi-Level DC/DC Converter wi...
49,80 € *
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Renewable energy sources are becoming increasingly important these days. The nuclear power phase-out in Germany and the limited amount of fossil energy resources will lead to further expansion of renewables. This might be directly linked with a change in the distribution and transportation grid. As early as in the 1990's ABB introduced a DC grid vision in a Europe 20xx scenario [1]. DC transmission systems are already used in large offshore wind-park installations and offer beside technical advantages (increased efficiency, smaller transformers) also economic benefits [2]. From industry perspective, ABB recently introduced an onboard DC-grid for marine power and propulsion systems with a grid voltage of 1000 V and up to 20 MW of power [3]. But also DC distribution grids in the mediumvoltage level range have come into the focus of research in the last years [4]. According to [1], DC offers significant loss reduction, less visual impact, lower electromagnetic fields. Furthermore it is the only solution for sub-sea connections longer than 60 km. One key component for the required technology is the DC/DC converter, which is also used in solid state transformers [5]. DC/DC converters for small power and low-voltage levels are well known today. The dual-active bridge converter, consisting of two H-bridge or halfbridge converters, offers bidirectional power flow, galvanic isolation and is a well-established topology [6], [7]. The voltage drop over the effective stray inductance of the transformer, which corresponds to the transferred power, is controlled by the phase-shift between both transformer voltages. An overview of the different galvanically isolated DC/DC converters is given in [8] and [9]. Recent research is investigating the potential to optimize the dual-active H-bridge converter using a transformer zero-voltage level [10]. The zero-voltage level is obtained by switching-on either both upper or both lower switches of the H-bridge simultaneously. The principle of realizing a zero-voltage level by phase-shifting both halfbridges of the H-bridge was already introduced with the single-active bridge, also known as the phase-shifted bridge [11]. Medium-voltage high-power realisations are very rare. According to Table 2.2 in [12], there is no demonstrator of a galvanically isolated bidirectional DC/DC converter with a voltage rating of at least 6 kV and a minimum power rating of 100 kW known to the author. Few converter concepts exist with similar or higher ratings, but these are bound to research environments and are still under development. In case the classical H-bridge or half-bridge configuration is used, the maximum DC-link voltage is limited by the blocking voltage of the power electronic switches. To overcome this limitation a series connection of dual-active bridges can be used. Alternatively, a direct series connection of switches is conceivable and requires measures to limit statically and dynamically the maximum voltage across each single switch [4]. For example, balancing resistors and RC-snubbers or intelligent gate driver units are used. But altogether losses are produced continuously. The maximum voltage across the switches can be limited by e.g. clamping diodes or active switches leading to multi-level converter topologies for the dualactive bridge. Due to the current flow through the clamping diodes several sub-operations modes can be distinguished. Even with a single three-level NPC (neutral point clamped converter [13]) or ANPC (active neutral point clamped [14]) half-bridge configuration, natural voltage doubling in one-phase configurations is possible. With every additional voltage-level, the degree of freedom for the operation of the converter can be increased. In literature there are only a few publications with an three-level NPC DC/DC converter, but either with an unidirectional power flow or not using the additional degree of freedom [15]. Higher voltagelevel topologies used in a galvanically isolated dual-active bridge configuration could not be found [16]. They are named multi-level DC/DC converters. A structured analysis of the entire load and operation range of the three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge or of a multi-level DC/DC converter, including all analytical formulae to design and optimize the converter is not known to the author. Multilevel DC/DC converters are investigated in this thesis exemplarily for the three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge DC/DC converter. The derived analytical approach can be applied analogously to more-level DC/DC converter topologies. In this thesis only topologies with clamping diodes are considered. Other multi-level topologies like flying capacitor converters can be used likewise, but they are not considered in this dissertation. Chapter 2 includes definitions for the comparison of different topologies and formulae for the optimization of the converters. This includes power definitions as well as the derivation of formulae adapted to multi-level DC/DC converters to compare the core losses or transformer utilization of different topologies. Design aspects of the transformer are covered as far as they concern multi-level DC/DC converters. The design of the transformer in general is not part of this chapter due to sufficiently published literature on this topic. In Chapter 3 the three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge DC/DC converter as an example of a multi-level DC/DC converter is introduced. In contrast to the well-known dual-active bridge with H-bridge or half-bridge converters, a three-level neutral point clamped converter on the high-voltage side replaces the H-bridge. A structured analysis of all main operation modes with an exhaustive analytical description with all it's formulae is presented. Two operation modes are identified to operate this topology over the full load range. These two main operation modes are divided into sub-operation modes in Chapter 4. Each sub-operation mode is distinguished by the transformer current at the switching instants. Furthermore, each sub-operation mode is characterized by the power electronic switching behaviour: hard-switched, zero-voltage turn-on switched or near zero-current switched. Formulae to operate the converter in a selected sub-operation mode are given. From these equations the dependence and limitations on the transferred power and voltage transformation ratio can be extracted. This chapter provides the mathematical basis to use the whole optimization potential of the converter. In Chapter 5 a control structure for multi-level DC/DC converters is proposed. It consists of a feed-forward and closed-loop control. The feed-forward linearises the converter's behaviour for the control and allows a fast reaction to new reference values. The PI closed-loop controller levels out losses and other errors not covered by the analytical equations. Further topics are the gate signal generation and the steady-state start of the converter to avoid a possible saturation of the transformer core at the PWM start. At the end of this chapter, necessary information will be presented to design and realize a multi-level DC/DC converter in hardware. Chapter 6 describes a hardware realization of a 3.3 kV. 6 kV, 100 kW galvanically isolated three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge DC/DC converter, which seems to be unique, at least in the university environment [12]. This DC/DC converter is part of a built battery energy storage system and test facility for the characterization of batteries in the kV range. Besides practical design aspects as, for example, the construction of a low-inductance two-layer busbar for the three-level NPC converter, a comparison of measurement and simulation results is given, showing good concordance of the simulation and the analytical description with the real system. The chapter closes with measurement results inside the battery energy storage system, depicting the excellent controllability and sensor resolution of the converter. Chapter 7 shows the application of the derived analytical approach to a five-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge for the first operation mode. An extension to threephases of the three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge is presented, before the N-level NPC / N-level NPC multi-phase dual-active bridge converter is introduced. The thesis closes with a summary in Chapter 8. This chapter discusses possible future work, for example the influence of the transformer configuration in multi-phase topologies or the comparison between multi-level DC/DC converters and the series-connection of dualactive bridges with H-bridge converters.

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A Medium-Voltage Multi-Level DC/DC Converter wi...
49,80 € *
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Renewable energy sources are becoming increasingly important these days. The nuclear power phase-out in Germany and the limited amount of fossil energy resources will lead to further expansion of renewables. This might be directly linked with a change in the distribution and transportation grid. As early as in the 1990's ABB introduced a DC grid vision in a Europe 20xx scenario [1]. DC transmission systems are already used in large offshore wind-park installations and offer beside technical advantages (increased efficiency, smaller transformers) also economic benefits [2]. From industry perspective, ABB recently introduced an onboard DC-grid for marine power and propulsion systems with a grid voltage of 1000 V and up to 20 MW of power [3]. But also DC distribution grids in the mediumvoltage level range have come into the focus of research in the last years [4]. According to [1], DC offers significant loss reduction, less visual impact, lower electromagnetic fields. Furthermore it is the only solution for sub-sea connections longer than 60 km. One key component for the required technology is the DC/DC converter, which is also used in solid state transformers [5]. DC/DC converters for small power and low-voltage levels are well known today. The dual-active bridge converter, consisting of two H-bridge or halfbridge converters, offers bidirectional power flow, galvanic isolation and is a well-established topology [6], [7]. The voltage drop over the effective stray inductance of the transformer, which corresponds to the transferred power, is controlled by the phase-shift between both transformer voltages. An overview of the different galvanically isolated DC/DC converters is given in [8] and [9]. Recent research is investigating the potential to optimize the dual-active H-bridge converter using a transformer zero-voltage level [10]. The zero-voltage level is obtained by switching-on either both upper or both lower switches of the H-bridge simultaneously. The principle of realizing a zero-voltage level by phase-shifting both halfbridges of the H-bridge was already introduced with the single-active bridge, also known as the phase-shifted bridge [11]. Medium-voltage high-power realisations are very rare. According to Table 2.2 in [12], there is no demonstrator of a galvanically isolated bidirectional DC/DC converter with a voltage rating of at least 6 kV and a minimum power rating of 100 kW known to the author. Few converter concepts exist with similar or higher ratings, but these are bound to research environments and are still under development. In case the classical H-bridge or half-bridge configuration is used, the maximum DC-link voltage is limited by the blocking voltage of the power electronic switches. To overcome this limitation a series connection of dual-active bridges can be used. Alternatively, a direct series connection of switches is conceivable and requires measures to limit statically and dynamically the maximum voltage across each single switch [4]. For example, balancing resistors and RC-snubbers or intelligent gate driver units are used. But altogether losses are produced continuously. The maximum voltage across the switches can be limited by e.g. clamping diodes or active switches leading to multi-level converter topologies for the dualactive bridge. Due to the current flow through the clamping diodes several sub-operations modes can be distinguished. Even with a single three-level NPC (neutral point clamped converter [13]) or ANPC (active neutral point clamped [14]) half-bridge configuration, natural voltage doubling in one-phase configurations is possible. With every additional voltage-level, the degree of freedom for the operation of the converter can be increased. In literature there are only a few publications with an three-level NPC DC/DC converter, but either with an unidirectional power flow or not using the additional degree of freedom [15]. Higher voltagelevel topologies used in a galvanically isolated dual-active bridge configuration could not be found [16]. They are named multi-level DC/DC converters. A structured analysis of the entire load and operation range of the three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge or of a multi-level DC/DC converter, including all analytical formulae to design and optimize the converter is not known to the author. Multilevel DC/DC converters are investigated in this thesis exemplarily for the three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge DC/DC converter. The derived analytical approach can be applied analogously to more-level DC/DC converter topologies. In this thesis only topologies with clamping diodes are considered. Other multi-level topologies like flying capacitor converters can be used likewise, but they are not considered in this dissertation. Chapter 2 includes definitions for the comparison of different topologies and formulae for the optimization of the converters. This includes power definitions as well as the derivation of formulae adapted to multi-level DC/DC converters to compare the core losses or transformer utilization of different topologies. Design aspects of the transformer are covered as far as they concern multi-level DC/DC converters. The design of the transformer in general is not part of this chapter due to sufficiently published literature on this topic. In Chapter 3 the three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge DC/DC converter as an example of a multi-level DC/DC converter is introduced. In contrast to the well-known dual-active bridge with H-bridge or half-bridge converters, a three-level neutral point clamped converter on the high-voltage side replaces the H-bridge. A structured analysis of all main operation modes with an exhaustive analytical description with all it's formulae is presented. Two operation modes are identified to operate this topology over the full load range. These two main operation modes are divided into sub-operation modes in Chapter 4. Each sub-operation mode is distinguished by the transformer current at the switching instants. Furthermore, each sub-operation mode is characterized by the power electronic switching behaviour: hard-switched, zero-voltage turn-on switched or near zero-current switched. Formulae to operate the converter in a selected sub-operation mode are given. From these equations the dependence and limitations on the transferred power and voltage transformation ratio can be extracted. This chapter provides the mathematical basis to use the whole optimization potential of the converter. In Chapter 5 a control structure for multi-level DC/DC converters is proposed. It consists of a feed-forward and closed-loop control. The feed-forward linearises the converter's behaviour for the control and allows a fast reaction to new reference values. The PI closed-loop controller levels out losses and other errors not covered by the analytical equations. Further topics are the gate signal generation and the steady-state start of the converter to avoid a possible saturation of the transformer core at the PWM start. At the end of this chapter, necessary information will be presented to design and realize a multi-level DC/DC converter in hardware. Chapter 6 describes a hardware realization of a 3.3 kV. 6 kV, 100 kW galvanically isolated three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge DC/DC converter, which seems to be unique, at least in the university environment [12]. This DC/DC converter is part of a built battery energy storage system and test facility for the characterization of batteries in the kV range. Besides practical design aspects as, for example, the construction of a low-inductance two-layer busbar for the three-level NPC converter, a comparison of measurement and simulation results is given, showing good concordance of the simulation and the analytical description with the real system. The chapter closes with measurement results inside the battery energy storage system, depicting the excellent controllability and sensor resolution of the converter. Chapter 7 shows the application of the derived analytical approach to a five-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge for the first operation mode. An extension to threephases of the three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge is presented, before the N-level NPC / N-level NPC multi-phase dual-active bridge converter is introduced. The thesis closes with a summary in Chapter 8. This chapter discusses possible future work, for example the influence of the transformer configuration in multi-phase topologies or the comparison between multi-level DC/DC converters and the series-connection of dualactive bridges with H-bridge converters.

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Multichannel Mac Scheme to Deliver Real Time Sa...
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Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) provides facility of driving assistance and multimedia services to the road users. To improve the Intelligent Transportation System, Vehicular Ad-Hoc Networks are the most prominent area that improve the services of ITS. Vehicular Ad-Hoc Networks apply multiple channel medium access control scheme according to the IEEE 1609.4 standard draft. According to the standard draft multiple channel medium access control scheme, channels are split into service channels (SCHs) and control channel (CCHs). This book proposes a dynamic control channel interval (DCI) MAC scheme that can variably fix the time interval between SCHs and CCH efficiently. The book divides the SCHs interval time into small interval time slots according to the current network traffic load.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 16.02.2020
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A Medium-Voltage Multi-Level DC/DC Converter wi...
49,80 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Renewable energy sources are becoming increasingly important these days. The nuclear power phase-out in Germany and the limited amount of fossil energy resources will lead to further expansion of renewables. This might be directly linked with a change in the distribution and transportation grid. As early as in the 1990’s ABB introduced a DC grid vision in a Europe 20xx scenario [1]. DC transmission systems are already used in large offshore wind-park installations and offer beside technical advantages (increased efficiency, smaller transformers) also economic benefits [2]. From industry perspective, ABB recently introduced an onboard DC-grid for marine power and propulsion systems with a grid voltage of 1000 V and up to 20 MW of power [3]. But also DC distribution grids in the mediumvoltage level range have come into the focus of research in the last years [4]. According to [1], DC offers significant loss reduction, less visual impact, lower electromagnetic fields. Furthermore it is the only solution for sub-sea connections longer than 60 km.One key component for the required technology is the DC/DC converter, which is also used in solid state transformers [5]. DC/DC converters for small power and low-voltage levels are well known today. The dual-active bridge converter, consisting of two H-bridge or halfbridge converters, offers bidirectional power flow, galvanic isolation and is a well-established topology [6], [7]. The voltage drop over the effective stray inductance of the transformer, which corresponds to the transferred power, is controlled by the phase-shift between both transformer voltages. An overview of the different galvanically isolated DC/DC converters is given in [8] and [9]. Recent research is investigating the potential to optimize the dual-active H-bridge converter using a transformer zero-voltage level [10]. The zero-voltage level is obtained by switching-on either both upper or both lower switches of the H-bridge simultaneously. The principle of realizing a zero-voltage level by phase-shifting both halfbridges of the H-bridge was already introduced with the single-active bridge, also known as the phase-shifted bridge [11].Medium-voltage high-power realisations are very rare. According to Table 2.2 in [12], there is no demonstrator of a galvanically isolated bidirectional DC/DC converter with a voltage rating of at least 6 kV and a minimum power rating of 100 kW known to the author. Few converter concepts exist with similar or higher ratings, but these are bound to research environments and are still under development.In case the classical H-bridge or half-bridge configuration is used, the maximum DC-link voltage is limited by the blocking voltage of the power electronic switches. To overcome this limitation a series connection of dual-active bridges can be used. Alternatively, a direct series connection of switches is conceivable and requires measures to limit statically and dynamically the maximum voltage across each single switch [4]. For example, balancing resistors and RC-snubbers or intelligent gate driver units are used. But altogether losses are produced continuously. The maximum voltage across the switches can be limited by e.g. clamping diodes or active switches leading to multi-level converter topologies for the dualactive bridge. Due to the current flow through the clamping diodes several sub-operations modes can be distinguished. Even with a single three-level NPC (neutral point clamped converter [13]) or ANPC (active neutral point clamped [14]) half-bridge configuration, natural voltage doubling in one-phase configurations is possible. With every additional voltage-level, the degree of freedom for the operation of the converter can be increased. In literature there are only a few publications with an three-level NPC DC/DC converter, but either with an unidirectional power flow or not using the additional degree of freedom [15]. Higher voltagelevel topologies used in a galvanically isolated dual-active bridge configuration could not be found [16]. They are named multi-level DC/DC converters.A structured analysis of the entire load and operation range of the three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge or of a multi-level DC/DC converter, including all analytical formulae to design and optimize the converter is not known to the author. Multilevel DC/DC converters are investigated in this thesis exemplarily for the three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge DC/DC converter. The derived analytical approach can be applied analogously to more-level DC/DC converter topologies. In this thesis only topologies with clamping diodes are considered. Other multi-level topologies like flying capacitor converters can be used likewise, but they are not considered in this dissertation.Chapter 2 includes definitions for the comparison of different topologies and formulae for the optimization of the converters. This includes power definitions as well as the derivation of formulae adapted to multi-level DC/DC converters to compare the core losses or transformer utilization of different topologies. Design aspects of the transformer are covered as far as they concern multi-level DC/DC converters. The design of the transformer in general is not part of this chapter due to sufficiently published literature on this topic.In Chapter 3 the three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge DC/DC converter as an example of a multi-level DC/DC converter is introduced. In contrast to the well-known dual-active bridge with H-bridge or half-bridge converters, a three-level neutral point clamped converter on the high-voltage side replaces the H-bridge. A structured analysis of all main operation modes with an exhaustive analytical description with all it’s formulae is presented. Two operation modes are identified to operate this topology over the full load range.These two main operation modes are divided into sub-operation modes in Chapter 4. Each sub-operation mode is distinguished by the transformer current at the switching instants. Furthermore, each sub-operation mode is characterized by the power electronic switching behaviour: hard-switched, zero-voltage turn-on switched or near zero-current switched. Formulae to operate the converter in a selected sub-operation mode are given. From these equations the dependence and limitations on the transferred power and voltage transformation ratio can be extracted. This chapter provides the mathematical basis to use the whole optimization potential of the converter.In Chapter 5 a control structure for multi-level DC/DC converters is proposed. It consists of a feed-forward and closed-loop control. The feed-forward linearises the converter’s behaviour for the control and allows a fast reaction to new reference values. The PI closed-loop controller levels out losses and other errors not covered by the analytical equations. Further topics are the gate signal generation and the steady-state start of the converter to avoid a possible saturation of the transformer core at the PWM start. At the end of this chapter, necessary information will be presented to design and realize a multi-level DC/DC converter in hardware.Chapter 6 describes a hardware realization of a 3.3 kV. 6 kV, 100 kW galvanically isolated three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge DC/DC converter, which seems to be unique, at least in the university environment [12]. This DC/DC converter is part of a built battery energy storage system and test facility for the characterization of batteries in the kV range. Besides practical design aspects as, for example, the construction of a low-inductance two-layer busbar for the three-level NPC converter, a comparison of measurement and simulation results is given, showing good concordance of the simulation and the analytical description with the real system. The chapter closes with measurement results inside the battery energy storage system, depicting the excellent controllability and sensor resolution of the converter.Chapter 7 shows the application of the derived analytical approach to a five-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge for the first operation mode. An extension to threephases of the three-level NPC / two-level one-phase dual-active bridge is presented, before the N-level NPC / N-level NPC multi-phase dual-active bridge converter is introduced.The thesis closes with a summary in Chapter 8. This chapter discusses possible future work, for example the influence of the transformer configuration in multi-phase topologies or the comparison between multi-level DC/DC converters and the series-connection of dualactive bridges with H-bridge converters.

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Stand: 16.02.2020
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HVAC Design of a Healthcare Facility
79,00 € *
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HVAC Design of a Healthcare facility is a Graduation Project for a students group in the 2008 class of Mechanical Engineering at Cairo University. The work is an attempt to show the required procedures towards designing some of the necessary equipment of a typical medical center including a fire tube boiler, a domestic water heat exchanger, an air handling unit (AHU) and the fan coil units (FCUs) with reference to the used methodologies. Design parameters used were based on real life values obtained from acknowledged standards in the relevant topics. In addition, a brief review at the beginning of each chapter discusses and gives a general overview of the various types, practical arrangements and the used materials in the industry of the above equipments. At the very end of the book are simply developed computer programs that quickly generate the different parameters of fire tube boilers and domestic water heat exchanges in addition to another program that resembles the commercial cooling load estimation software packages with additional features such as a detailed psychrometric analysis.

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Price-based Energy Management in Competitive El...
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Revision with unchanged content. In recent years, many jurisdictions around the world have moved from the vertically integrated power systems to the deregulated competitive electricity markets. Unlike the integrated systems, future prices are uncertain in the new competitive electricity markets. This price uncertainty generally introduces a great deal of complexity in optimal planning and operation of electric energy systems. This monograph deals with sort-term optimal operation planning in a competitive electricity market by forecasting future prices. Various forecasting techniques are applied to generate price forecasts, and the corresponding practical challenges are discussed. Optimization models are developed for the short-term operation of two typical demand-side electricity market customers, namely, a municipal water plant facility and an industrial load owning self-generation facilities. The generated forecasts are used as inputs to the optimization models and optimal schedules are derived. Economic impact of price forecast inaccuracies on the customers is also examined.

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Stand: 16.02.2020
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